What Did Jesus Drive

What Did Jesus Drive

$19.95

Jason H. Vines

SKU: 18423 Category: Tags: , ,

Product Description

What Did Jesus Drive, Is mostly about crises in the car industry, but then it’s so much bigger! It’s about being on the front-line of one crisis after another, offering incredible insight in what to do and not do when the “you know what” hits the fan. It’s not theory; it’s real. Vines’ brutal frankness and lessons learned in the book are both shocking and refreshing, and often times hilarious. Vines’ points out, if vaunted enterprises like Toyota and BP can get caught off guard, any organization can. What Did Jesus Drive? is a breathtaking wake-up call and a wild ride. Buckle up. This book is the first “tell-all” of its kind!
Jason Vines takes readers on a graphic, sometimes sad and often hilarious behind-the-scenes romp through some of the most publicized and studied crises in recent history. Vines cautions the reader up-front: “Relax, this is not a book about Jesus. However, he does appear in two chapters: first as a Hispanic grandfather from Waterford, Michigan, and later as the real Prince of Peace. No, this is a book about my life in the public relations blast furnace in the automotive industry; a quickly-derailed attempt to help a friend rebuild Detroit’s tattered image, thwarted by the sex, lies and corruption of former Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick; and, finally, trying to avoid another crisis with the number one selling book of all time. No, not Harry Potter; the Bible.” The crises Vines helped navigate through made headlines the world over: Jeep vehicles accused of deadly sudden unintended acceleration, Nissan’s near-death experience until it regained its MOJO, the Ford/Firestone tire mega-debacle, a jihad against SUVs by the “What Would Jesus Drive?” nuts, Detroit Mayor Kilpatrick’s drive to prison and finally avoiding a boycott of the most popular Bible in the world by evangelical Christian leaders. In his epilogue, titled “Government Motors on Fire,” Vines tackles the fake Chevy Volt fire crisis and General Motors’ 2014 nightmare with its faulty ignition switches that led to at least 13 deaths and may lead to criminal indictments. Vines shares lessons learned and mistakes made. He notes that if he can impart anything in this book, it is the guiding principles he believes useful for any organization (not just the auto industry) or individual to avoid, mitigate or survive the inevitable crisis. As he puts it: “If you think you are immune to a crisis, you’ve already failed an overarching guiding principle.”