Car Racing 1967

Car Racing 1967

The third volume in the ‘Car Racing’ collection, 1967 bears witness to the gradual appearance of color.

Photographers henceforth juggled rolls of both black & white and color film as they ventured as close as possible to the drivers and throngs entranced with speed and competition. Industries and automobile marques understood the full import of the tremendous platform motorsport offered them, and became ever more enthusiastic to share their stories and victories with the public. Many are mentioned in these pages, including Ford’s extraordinary epic with the Cosworth engine and triumph at Le Mans. This volume also showcases portraits of drivers from François Cevert to Bruce McLaren, and touches on the careers of legendary designers such as Jean Rédélé, Colin Chapman and Jim Hall… In their lively commentary, Johnny Rives and Manou Zurini take evident pleasure in recalling old acquaintances from the pitched fever of the track, joyfully sharing their knowledge through anecdotes and memories.
Text in English and French.

Text in English and French.

Boost! Roger Bailey’s Extraordinary Motor Racing Career

Boost! Roger Bailey’s Extraordinary Motor Racing Career

Perhaps nobody in the history of automobile racing enjoyed a career of wider reach and diversity than Roger Bailey. Over the course of 52 years (1959–2012) Bailey competed as a mechanic, engine builder, crew chief, sanctioning body technical inspector and finally, co-founder and administrator of the Indy Lights series. Bailey’s career came to its culmination in 1986 when he co-founded the American Racing Series with Pat Patrick. In 1991, the ARS became the Indy Lights series with Bailey at the helm of the category through its heydays until his retirement in 2012.

Boost! details Bailey’s life and career, documenting the many skills that made him so successful. “Roger was such a great guy,” Roger Penske declares. “He worked with us in the Can-Am in 1967 and you could see that his passion for racing was as strong as anyone’s. He brought a lot of good ideas to us and was one of the hardest workers we ever had in our organization.

“You could see that when he took over running the Indy Lights series. He had a broad skill set and people genuinely appreciated him as their leader. If you can lead people the way Roger has over the years, you build great momentum and in that way he was among the very best.”

Cranswick on Camaro 1967-81

Cranswick on Camaro 1967-81

Chevrolet was Number One in the sales race. If you needed a car, chances are Chevrolet made it. However, in 1964 there arose a problem. Some guy at Ford came up with a car called the Mustang, maybe you’ve heard of it? But don’t worry, Chevrolet had a solution called the Camaro.

In racing, where you are on lap one, isn’t nearly as important as your position when the checkered flag falls. By 1981, Camaro was so far in front of Mustang, Henry needed binoculars to see the Z28’s taillights! Camaro was part of the speed shop scene, modified by the most famous names of the muscle car era. In racing, Chevrolet’s pony left no stone unturned, inside and outside America.

With the fuel crisis, insurance, and inflation, America sought a new kind of coupe. The Bowtie boys even outsold Mustang, with that Z28 having the upper hand in the Chevrolet versus Ford rivalry. Chevrolet’s dedicated coupe even outfoxed Ford’s sedan based Mustang. If the Corvette is the King of American Sportscars, then ‘The Hugger’ must be the Prince of Ponies!

THE RACING AUTOBIOGRAPHY

THE RACING AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Based upon many hours of conversations taped exclusively for ‘Inside Track’, together with other material accumulated over many years of friendship with John Lamm, Doug Nye and others, The Racing Autobiography tells the story of Phil Hill’s life in his own words, from his childhood in 1930s California through his later years as co-owner of the highly successful Hill & Vaughn car restoration business, a respected motor sport writer and TV commentator, and much loved elder statesman of the American vintage and classic car movement with an unrivaled knowledge, in particular, of the Packard marque and its cars.

Illustrated by numerous photographs, letters, race posters and programmes, and other automobilia from the Hill Family archive, plus many other photographs of Phil’s racing career and beyond – including his last great victory in the charismatic Chaparral 2F at Brands Hatch in 1967 – the book offers an unrivaled view of this remarkable man.

The Racing Autobiography is hardbound with a cloth-covered case and inset photographs to match the two volumes of the Collector’s Edition, with the same page size and 428 pages, and is presented in its own cloth-covered slipcase.

 

The Ford that Beat Ferrari: A Racing History of the GT40  3rd Edition

The Ford that Beat Ferrari: A Racing History of the GT40 3rd Edition

After Ford unsuccessfully attempted to buy Ferrari, in 1963, the American car giant instead embarked on its own racing programme in a bid to beat the famous Italian marque at the world’s most prestigious race, the Le Mans 24 Hours, as told in the forthcoming Hollywood movie Ford v. Ferrari. This updated edition of The Ford that Beat Ferrari tells the story of how that mission was eventually accomplished.

  • Development of the GT40: how the prototype Ford GT emerged in 1964 from the previous year’s Lola GT programme.
  • The works teams and the GT40: the car’s racing exploits in its earlier years, first with Ford Advanced Vehicles (1964), then Shelby American (1965) and Alan Mann Racing (1966).
  • The big ones: this section of the book covers the GT40’s evolution into the 7-litre monsters that brought enormous success, including the first two Le Mans victories with the Mark II (1966) and Mark IV (1967), before becoming outlawed by new restrictions on engine size.
  • The Gulf years: against all expectations, the venerable GT40, now back to 5-litre power, raced on with John Wyer’s crack JW Automotive Engineering outfit in the iconic blue and orange colours of Gulf, successes including two further Le Mans wins (1968 and 1969).
  • The production line racer: the stories of the 68 privateers, big and small, who raced GT40s.
  • Chassis and drivers: a data section giving resumés of type designations, chassis histories and all drivers who raced GT40s.
  • The magic lives on: the book’s concluding sections show surviving cars at differing stages in their later life and bring the story up to date with developments since the 2005 edition
Works Healeys in Detail: Healey, Nash-Healey and Austin-Healey works competition entries, car-by-car

Works Healeys in Detail: Healey, Nash-Healey and Austin-Healey works competition entries, car-by-car

Graham Robson is the doyen of writers on rallying. His new book, Works Healeys in Detail, joins his respected Works Triumphs and Works Escorts in our list. Here he tells of the story of Donald Healey’s introduction of the cars of his own make into the world of rallying and racing, from the Healey Elliott and Westland of the late 1940s through to the last racing Austin-Healey Sprite in 1967. In between he produced competition versions of the Austin-Healey 100 and 100S, the 100-6 and the gloriously successful 3000, a brutal and wayward machine that won countless international rallies in the 1960s in the hands of great drivers like Pat Moss, Timo Makinen, Rauno Aaltonen and Paddy Hopkirk, to name but a few.

The book covers the career of each of the works cars individually: entries, drivers and results, with nearly all cars illustrated. In addition there is detailed colour photography of important surviving examples.

Original Chevrolet Camaro 1967-1969: The Restoration Guide

Original Chevrolet Camaro 1967-1969: The Restoration Guide

Factory-correct cars will always be the most valuable cars on the market. Original Chevrolet Camaro 1967-1969 tells you exactly which parts, accessories, finishes, fabrics, and colors you must have to restore your Camaro to its factory-original condition—or exactly what to look for when shopping for a restored Camaro.

Some 250 color images detail Chevy’s major performance packages of the period—the SS, RS and Z/28—while exhaustively detailing engines, interiors, and bodies. Of equal importance, muscle-car authority Jason Scott provides factory records, comprehensive specifications, detailed parts lists and codes, and period literature to offer the definitive guide to originality.

Chevrolet’s Camaro was introduced in 1967 on the heels of Ford’s best-selling Mustang. It quickly established itself as the go-to option for muscle-car customers wanting a more aggressive pony car.

During its first generation from 1967 to 1969, GM offered option packages to satisfy all tastes, from six-cylinders grocery-getters to agile small-block cars to big-block monsters ready for drag racing straight off the showroom floor. Today, these first-generation Camaros are some of the most valuable cars in the collectible muscle-car market.

This is a must-have volume for any enthusiast shopping for a first-generation Camaro or about to undertake a restoration project.

Alfa Romeo Tipo 33/ 1967

Alfa Romeo Tipo 33/ 1967

This book focuses exclusively on the development of the Tipo 33 and the motorsport activities of the car during 1967.

It was a long held belief that there was only scarce documentation available concerning Autodelta, the motorsport company. With the help of Dr. Marco Fazio we were able to unearth various diverse records from the Alfa Romeo archives which contained detailed reports of the race activities of Autodelta. With such records to hand we were able to build an complete picture, free of any doubt, of the cars that participated in races during 1967 in the works team.

In addition to the racing participation of the Tipo 33 we have also covered aspects of the Tipo 33 Stradale and the related Alfa Romeo OSI Scarabeo.

Work on a second book covering the 1968 racing season is currently under way and is planned for release in 2019.

312 pages, 224 black and white photographs and 114 colour photographs

COPO Camaro, Chevelle & Nova: Chevrolet’s Ultimate Muscle Cars

COPO Camaro, Chevelle & Nova: Chevrolet’s Ultimate Muscle Cars

The COPO Camaros, Chevelles, and Novas of the 1960s and early 1970s were the ultimate high-performance GM muscle cars. While few knew about this back channel program at the time, it is now recognized as the origin of GM’s top muscle cars. Dedicated Chevy racers and car owners were determined to compete head-to-head with Mopar and Ford at the racetrack and on the street. But in order to do so, they needed to circumvent the corporate ban on racing and resolve the restriction of 400-ci engines in intermediate vehicles. Don Yenko and some other creative individuals recognized the loophole in the COPO (Central Office Production Order) system at General Motors. The COPO program was designated for fleet vehicles such as taxicabs, but at the peak of the muscle car wars it was used to build the ultimate high-performance Chevy muscle cars.

Some horrific on-track accidents compelled General Motors to drop out of racing, yet GM did not want to allow Chrysler and Ford to steal the glory on Sundays while they stood on the sidelines. As a result, GM inconspicuously ran the Chevy racing and high-performance program through back channels, and COPO was integral part of the program.

Don Yenko became the COPO muscle car program chief architect and champion. He ordered the Corvair through the COPO program and created the Corvair Stinger to mount a SCCA road race campaign. From these humble beginnings, the road map for creating the ultimate Camaros, Chevelles, and Novas was established. Factory Camaro V-8s came equipped with the 350 small-block or 396 big-block, which had to compete with the Mustang Cobra Jets and Mopar Wedge and Hemi cars. In response, building the big-block Camaro through the COPO program was devised. At the factory, Camaros were fitted with the 396 engines and shipped to dealers where the 427s were installed in the cars. From 1967 to 1969, the factory and dealers installed eight different 427 engines, including the all aluminum ZL1 427. Later on, others used the road map to build COPO Novas and Chevelles to similar spec, with similar results. The COPO performance car program did not end with these muscle cars. Yenko even ordered several hundred Vegas through the COPO program, so they could be fitted with turbochargers and raced in SCCA competition.

Chevy muscle car aficionado and author Matt Avery retraces the history of the COPO program and the creation of these premier muscle cars. He has scoured archives and tracked down owners and personnel involved in the program to deliver a comprehensive story and complete guide to the COPO cars. The COPO muscle car and racing program produced a storied and remarkable journey, and author Matt Avery captures all these facets in this entertaining and revealing history.

Alan Mann Racing F3L/P68

Alan Mann Racing F3L/P68

The story of Ford’s three litre sports cars from the Sixties

The Ford P68 sports car is famous not because it enjoyed great success – indeed rather the opposite – but because it was a beautiful car and because it was powered by Ford’s legendary Cosworth DFV engine.

When at the end of 1967 the FIA changed its regulations for the Sports Car World Championship, Ford was left without a major title contender. Their successful seven-litre Ford GTs were no longer permitted to compete in the championship which now became exclusively for three-litre sports prototype cars. Thus Alan Mann, the person in charge of Ford’s European racing activities, saw an opportunity to build a new sports car around the DFV engine which was run successfully in Grand Prix racing.. Ford agreed and the much-respected designer, Len Bailey, created an ambitious and indisputably attractive race car.

However, from its first appearance in the Spring of 1968, the car encountered many technical set-backs including the fact that what was easy on the eye was not necessarily aerodynamically competitive with cars like the Porsche 907/908 and the Alfa Romeo Tipo 33.

This book tells the full story of the Ford P68 starting with the historic background of Ford in sports car racing, a portrait of Alan Mann Racing and the highly-successful DFV engine. Furthermore, it details the design and development phase of the P68 and its short but adventurous racing career and its after-live in historic racing.
One of the surviving P68s is now in the N-Anadol Collection in Switzerland and takes part in historic racing all over Europe. As it is in the same collection as the Ford GT 101 on which Ed Heuvink produced a previous book, the owner commissioned the writer to compose a biography of the Alan Mann car. Together with McKlein Publishing a 158 page book has been produced in line with the Ford GT 101 book.

The foreword is written by Richard Attwood, who drove the car during its short career in the late sixties as well as in several historic events some decades later, and the introduction by Henry Mann, the son of Alan Mann.

Technical details:
Author: Ed Heuvink
Foreword: Richard Attwood
Introduction: Henry Mann
Format: 29 x 29 cm, hardcover in a slipcase
Pages: 158
Pictures and illustrations: ca. 96 in colour and 123 in black-and-white
Language: English
Limited edition of only 999 copies

Alfa Romeo Tipo 33: The development and racing history

Alfa Romeo Tipo 33: The development and racing history

Alfa Romeo’s World Championship-winning sports car, the Tipo 33, enjoyed a long career; as a factory car, as well as in private hands from 1967 until 1977. The great Italian motor sport engineer Carlo Chiti designed and ran a prolific number of different models of this Tipo.

Unfortunately, nothing of the history of these developments was documented at the time. That is where authors Peter Collins and Ed McDonough come in. After an intense investigation and numerous personal interviews, to uncover much about this marvelous sports prototype, they are able to present Alfa Romeo Tipo 33.

The fruits of their labors abound, manifesting as many previously unseen photographs and the personal recollections of the prime movers in the Tipo 33’s career. If you like Alfas, you’ll love this book.

The Cruel Sport: Grand Prix Racing 1959-1967

The Cruel Sport: Grand Prix Racing 1959-1967

SOLD OUT

It was an era of daring, dashing drivers piloting incredibly powerful race cars around fast and legendary circuits with only primitive safety equipment to spare them disaster. The book includes sections covering the drivers, cars, factories, practice sessions, race day races and, inevitably, accidents. The text is incredibly compelling, as would be expected from a world-class writer. The design and photo presentation remain true to the original edition, published in 1963, and are supplemented by a new introduction and epilogue and revised captions. A rare period piece certain to delight racing fans.

Ford Small Block V8 Racing Engines 1962-1970

Ford Small Block V8 Racing Engines 1962-1970

This is the story of the Ford small block Fairlane V8 engine’s rapid evolution from passenger car engine to highly successful racing engine and the victories it fueled for years afterwards. Initially, in May 1960, a team of nine engineers, lead by George Stirrat, designed a lightweight, all cast-iron, compact, reliable and durable power-plant for passenger cars, but following its introduction in July 1961, Ford’s engineers quickly realized its potential benefits if modified for racing applications. Within three months, the capacity had been increased from 221ci to 260ci, and by early 1962 Carroll Shelby had fitted a High Performance 260ci version in his AC Cobra. Subsequently, the original design team began work on a second capacity increase, to achieve a High Performance 289ci unit; within three months the standard 289ci became available. Carroll Shelby went on to win the 1965 World Sports Car Championship using a HP-289ci. Aluminium block and cylinder head pushrod versions, designed in late 1962, had been constructed by early 1963, in preparation for that year’s Indianapolis 500, and the DOHC four-valve per cylinder 255ci raced in the 1964 and 1965 Indy 500, winning the latter outright. The 302ci replaced the 289ci for the 1968 car model year and, at Le Mans in 1968 and 1969, GT40 cars won outright using this variant of the small block. In 1965, 1966 and 1967, HP-289ci-powered Mustangs won the SCCA B-Production Championship and 1966 and 1967 Trans-Am Championships. A Bud Moore Engineering Boss 302 Mustang won the 1970 Trans-Am Championship. Ford invested much time and expertise into its racing activities in the 1960s, and there’s little doubt that the V8 Small Block engines took the company to the forefront of the racing world, until it withdrew from the sport in 1970.

1967 Chris Amon, Scuderia Ferrari and a Year of Living Dangerously

1967 Chris Amon, Scuderia Ferrari and a Year of Living Dangerously

“1967 was a milestone year in motor racing. For Ferrari, the season started with sports-car victories at Daytona and Monza, but soon turned tragic with the death of Lorenzo Bandini after an accident at the Monaco Grand Prix. At Spa, another spectacular accident put Mike Parkes out of action with two broken legs, and prompted Ludovico Scarfiotti to quit the Ferrari team. That left Chris Amon, a 23- year old New Zealander in his first year with the Italian team, to fight on alone until the year’s last race in Mexico. He would finished fourth in the F1 Drivers Championship after reaching the podium four times.
While Amon and Ferrari take center stage, 1967 also looks at the other drivers, teams, and events that shaped the campaign for the championship. The book includes observations and memories from such leading drivers as John Surtees and Dan Gurney, as well as informed insiders like Amon’s countryman Howden Ganley, Enzo Ferrari’s assistant Brenda Vernor, and Grand Prix star Eva Marie Saint. It also goes beyond Amon’s time with Ferrari, covering both his early years with the Cooper and Parnell teams, his 1966 victory at Le Mans with Bruce McLaren, and his later career with March and Matra.

Amon worked closely with author John Julian to explain exactly what it was like to compete at the highest level during a unique moment in motorsports history, and his first-hand recollections give the book a very personal quality. Julian’s vibrant prose and extended quotes from key characters make 1967 a fast-paced read, with a wealth of photographs adding atmosphere and excitement. And while the book includes enough detail to satisfy the most serious fan, it also offers a wider view of a bygone era by noting other events in the news, popular songs of the day, and local details about each major race.

Unipower GT

Unipower GT

This fully authenticated publication written by Gerry Hulford, is a 500 copy Limited publication. Launched in 1966 to an admiring press and public alike, the Unipower GT took the specialist car market at the time by storm. Considered by the cognoscenti as the best of the limited production sports cars of the 60’s, the car appealed to both wealthy and enthusiast alike. In its later years the cars would embark on a chequered but never to be forgotten campaign of international sports car racing across Europe, almost qualifying for the 1969 Le Mans 24 hrs. Production ceased in late 1969 after just 73 examples had been built, but with still at least 70% production existing, they remain much sought after by collectors the world over. Gerry Hulford has assembled here an historical record of the marque in 172 pages, from its early production and beyond, with an amazing collection of over 420 photographs many of which have never been seen before, illustrating the extraordinary history of these unique cars. The story and photographs take you on an intriguing journey from its inception, development and production, before following owner’s cars across the world, many of whom have lovingly cared for some immaculate examples, as well as those who have devoted considerable effort to the restoration of their cars. The racing history from early 1967 through to today, is covered in detail and chronicles the many on-track endeavours against all odds. Detail on the cars also includes, technical information on suspension setup and a guide to what to look for when buying a Unipower GT. This is the most comprehensive and fully authenticated, by both its Founder and designer, record of the Unipower GT in all its versions and has enough historical information to satisfy the most demanding specialist car owner and enthusiast alike, the supports why it is still revered as the ‘Mini-Miura” of the 60s.

Hemi Under Glass Bob Riggle and His Wheel-Standing Mopars

Hemi Under Glass Bob Riggle and His Wheel-Standing Mopars

Look up to the skies through Bob Riggle’s eyes in this wheelstanding, must-have Mopar history book on Hemi Under Glass!

While the established stock and modified brackets are long-recognized as the heart and soul of drag racing, it was the wheelstanders that more often than not put butts in the bleachers. In that category, some of the most well-known names included Bill “Maverick” Golden’s Little Red Wagon, Bill Shewsberry’s L.A. Dart and Chuck Poole’s Chuck Wagon. Although, most memorable of all was the Hurst Hemi Under Glass Plymouth Barracuda campaigned by Bob Riggle.

Riggle started his career in the early 1960s as a car builder and mechanic for Hurst-Campbell and eventually ascended to pilot the Hemi Under Glass. When he left Hurst in 1969, the Hemi Under Glass franchise transferred with Riggle. He continued for six more years as the owner/driver of a succession of Hemi Under Glass renditions. In the 1990s he resurrected the concept of the original car—making four different versions (1966, 1967, 1968, and 1969)—and continued to thrill drag racing fans with his wheelstanding antics.

At the time of this writing, Bob’s last run with the Hemi Under Glass was in the summer of 2019. He claims to have retired (he was 83 years old at the time), but he’s claimed that before!

For all the success he enjoyed over his long and distinguished career, which is believed to be one of the longest in all of motorsports, he’s best remembered for a run at Irwindale Raceway in early 2016 with comedian and car buff Jay Leno in the passenger seat in a video that has been viewed more than 10 million times.

This is Bob’s story, one that Mark Fletcher and Richard Truesdell, co-authors of the 2012 book Hurst Equipped, are honored to share. They say the story was easy to tell—given their unprecedented access not only to Bob but also to his vast archive of photos that reflect his ongoing popularity. Many of the photos in this book are seen in print for the very first time.

BSA: The Complete Story

BSA: The Complete Story

BSA was once the world’s most successful motorcycle company, manufacturing more machines than any other in the world by the mid-1950s. And yet, after winning the Queens Award to Industry for exports in 1967 and 1968, it collapsed into bankruptcy in 1973.

This is an epic story of rise and fall, even by the precarious standards of the British motorcycle industry. With more than 170 illustrations, this book recalls the founding of the company and its foray into bicycle and then motorcycle production and describes the evolution of the various models of motorcycles including specification tables. It discusses the diversification into cars, commercial vehicles and guns for Spitfires and recounts the successes – two Maudes Trophies and numerous racing victories. Finally, it documents the fall from grace to bankruptcy and beyond.

In the Mind’s Eye

In the Mind’s Eye

A car by car record of early Chevron single seat racing cars
updated edition

In the late 1960’s a young engineer worked at the Chevron factory in Bolton. His name was Kevin Hodgkinson and he fell in love with the cars he was building. Later he lived a dream when he owned one of those cars – a Chevron B17 – and used the car in hillclimb and sprint events.

Kevin has an encyclopaedic knowledge of the early Chevron single seat race cars and in 2009 he published “In The Mind’s Eye: Chevron Classic Formula Race Cars 1967 – 1970”. The book rapidly sold out.

Kevin has now updated the book with additional content and the second edition of the book details every single seat racing car coming out of the Chevron factory in that period.

Hubert Platt: Fast Fords of the “Georgia Shaker”

Hubert Platt: Fast Fords of the “Georgia Shaker”

Webster’s Dictionary lists the term showman as “a notably spectacular, dramatic, or effective performer.” In the art of drag racing, Hubert Platt checked all boxes. Known as the “Georgia Shaker,” Platt cut his motoring teeth on the long straightaways and twisty back roads of South Carolina while bootlegging moonshine. After a run-in with the law in 1958, Platt transferred his driving skills from illegal activity to sanctioned drag racing and began one of the most dominant runs in drag racing history until his retirement in 1977.

After stints in 1957, 1938, and 1962 Chevrolets, Platt’s next ride was a Z11 Impala, which carried his first “Georgia Shaker” moniker. Once Chevrolet pulled out of sanctioned racing, Platt found a new home with Ford for 1964 and remained there until he hung up his helmet. Some of the cars he campaigned became icons in their own right. His factory-backed and personal machines included a 1963 Z11 Impala, 1964 Thunderbolt, 1965 Falcon, 1966 Mustang Funny Car, 1967 Fairlane 427, 1968-1/2 Cobra Jet, 1969 CJ Mustang, 1970 427 SOHC Mustang, and 1970 Boss 429 Maverick.

A 1986 NHRA Hall of Fame member, Platt’s lasting legacy on the sport can’t be denied. Whether he was launching his Falcon with the door open, conducting a Ford Drag Team seminar, or posting low E.T. at the 1967 US Nationals in his Fairlane, Platt’s imprint on drag racing was all-encompassing. His son and biggest fan, Allen Platt, shares his dad’s iconic career in, Hubert Platt: Fast Fords of the “Georgia Shaker”!

The Corvette Hunter: Kevin Mackay’s Greatest Corvette Finds

The Corvette Hunter: Kevin Mackay’s Greatest Corvette Finds

SOLD OUT

It is hard to imagine that a car with the racing pedigree of the Rebel Corvette could be neglected to the point of it being lost. Winning the GT class at the 1972 12 Hours of Sebring wasn’t enough to keep this car from becoming just another old wreck out behind the shed. It was many years before Kevin Mackay came to rescue this prominent machine.

Finding, documenting, restoring, and selling rare and valuable Corvettes is one of Mackay’s specialties. His business, Corvette Repair Inc., is considered the premier Corvette restoration facility in the country. However, it just wasn’t the Rebel L88 Corvette that he found and restored.

Mackay tells story after story of finding and restoring valuable Corvettes such as the 1960 Briggs Cunningham Le Mans racer that took 1st in class. He also tells stories of Steve McQueen’s 1966 Corvette, the 1967 Bounty Hunter racer, 1968 Sunray DX #2 and #3, and chassis #003 from 1953. If you like L88 Corvettes, no one has bought and restored more of them than Kevin Mackay!

Few authorities in the hobby could be counted on to provide this much entertainment in a single volume.